Monday, May 29, 2017  
 
News & Updates
VISITING MOUNT BUFFALO IN MAY
13-04-2017 
Our Mountain is amazing in the Autumn, but it is getting colder so make sure that you bring some warm clothes as the alps are normally 10 degrees cooler than Bright and the Alpine valleys. There are still enough warm days for rock climbing and abseiling in the gorge, bushwalking or a bike ride.
Spoil yourself and "Visit Mount Buffalo" this Autumn.

LAKE CATANI CAMPING GROUND CLOSED
13-04-2017 
Note that Parks Victoria have now closed the Lake Catani camping ground for general camping (There are limited snow camping sites available during winter). Camping reopens again in November.


Archive

HISTORY

Aborigines were once drawn to the area in summer by the large numbers of bogong moths which were seeking relief from the higher temperatures of the plains. After roasting them in strips of bark they ate the bodies or ground them into a paste. It is said the moths tasted like prawns.

The first Europeans to record the Plateau were William Hovel and Hamilton Hume on 24 November 1824. They named the mountain Mount Buffalo from its supposed resemblance to this animal from where they were viewing it from.


The mountain's highest peak is The Horn. It was first climbed by Baron Ferdinand Von Mueller in 1853, a government botanist, who collected many unrecognised species on his excursion.

Visitors were drawn to the magnificent views as early as the 1850s and an alpine club was established in 1883 to promote tourism. A local guide book came out in 1887 featuring local walking tracks and bridle paths. Some of these historic tracks are still in use.

The first land was set aside as a national park in 1898 and the now National park has been enlarged several times since its first inception and now takes in most of the mountain and its slopes and surroundings.

The Mount Buffalo Chalet was built in 1910 but there had been other smaller lodges at the Gorge area and even tented camps.


Australia's first ski tow and ski lifts were installed at Dingo Dell and both Dingo Dell and Cresta vallley were used for skiing and snowplay in the 1920s and 1930s.

There are many interesting historical figures associated with Mount Buffalo. Alice Manfield being one of these, commonly known as Guide Alice, she was a feminist figure in Victoria, a mountain guide, naturalist, author, Chalet owner (Pre the current Chalet) and photographer. She was a pioneer in the developent of tourism at Mount Buffalo and somewhat of a tourist attraction in her own right in particular with her work as a guide in the period from the 1890s to the 1930s. Alice was also a key player in lobbying for the establishment of Mount Buffalo as a national park. She was born in 1878 and died in 1960. She is known for wearing trousers at a period in history where this was both unusual and frowned on.

 

GUIDE ALIVE WEARING HER FAMOUS TROUSERS 

     

GUIDE ALICE WORKING ON A TOUR ON THE TRACK TO THE SUMMIT