Sunday, August 18, 2019  
 
News & Updates
GREAT SNOW AT MOUNT BUFFALO
13-08-2019 
We finally have great snow after four days of snow falls. The Parks Victoria rangers will be out grooming the cross country ski trails and toboggan runs - This week and next weekend will be an amazing time to Visit Mount Buffalo as a snow covered Winter Wonderland. (Check out the Dingo Dell snow cam as well)

CHAINS AT MOUNT BUFFALO
11-07-2019 
Chains must be carried to Mount Buffalo and fitted as directed until further notice (Normally all of August). Chains are required when there is snow forecast below 1600 metres and / or the roads have ice or snow cover - There are daily updates by Parks Victoria provided to ski hires etc and we provide detailed visitor snow and weather info on our Face Book page.


Archive

ABOUT OUR MOUNTAIN

GEOLOGY
Formed well below the earths surface millions of years ago, wind, water and ice have eroded away the granite leaving behind the mountain's amazing rock formations.  The sedimentary rocks that originally covered the area (and some of the metamorphic rocks of the contact zones) can still be seen at places on the road to the mountain top.
Pegmatites and Dykes will be found in the granites of mount Buffalo by the observant person (although not crystal rich as are the pegmatites of the Beechworth Granites). Xenoliths are also interesting and quite common.

ABOUT XENOLITHS
www.umanitoba.ca/geoscience/faculty/arc/xenolith.html

MORE ABOUT GRANITE
geology.about.com/od/more_igrocks/a/granite.ht


Explorers Hume and Hovell named Mount Buffalo in 1824 as they passed through the area on their way from Sydney to Port Phillip Bay traveling through what is now the Wangaratta / Glenrowan ares. They likened the mountain to a sleeping buffalo in the distance. This explains the names for the granite tors such as the Horn and the Hump.

MORE ABOUT HUME AND HOVELL
www.australianhistory.org/hume-hovell.php
www.kidcyber.com.au/topics/humenhovell.htm

The Horn (at the South End of the Mountain), rises to 1723 metres and is the highest point on the plateau.

SEE THE DROP DOWN MENU FOR MORE INFORMATION